posted on October 6th 2017 in Blog /

It all started in the 8th grade. A simple try out for the middle school football team led to the discovery that Scot Imus had hyperthropic cardiomyopathy. For most of his life, the disease was never a factor, aside from the yearly checkups with his cardiologist. Scot enjoyed a thriving career in politics, family time, boating and was an avid golfer – until one day everything changed.

“In 2008, I was on a business trip in Madison, WI when I started having a hard time catching my breath. It got to the point where I was up all night and decided to go to the ER to have it checked out,” Scot said. “That was the first time I got the diagnosis that I was in early stages of heart failure.”

Six years later, in October of 2014, Scot walked into St. Vincent – Indianapolis for an appointment and was immediately referred to the heart failure unit. “It was there where doctors candidly told me that I would need a heart transplant to survive. I knew my condition was serious. I knew I didn’t feel great. But, I never realized I would be a candidate for a transplant. I was shocked.” Scot said.

By March 26, 2015, Scot was placed on the waiting list. On April 2nd, he was checked into the ICU at St. Vincent. “I waited captive in my small hospital room fearing surgery, feeling despondent knowing my best day would be someone’s worst day, wondering how long I would wait,” Scot said.

13 days later on April 15, Scot’s wait ended.

“As a golfer, I had been following PGA player and two-time heart recipient, Erik Compton. I felt really positive heading into surgery because of his journey. I was focused on the new life that awaited me. I was determined to get better. I vowed to play in Erik’s golf outing supporting donation and transplantation a year later.”

After recovering from his transplant, Scot learned that his donor was a male in his early 30s. Picturing him as a father – Scot decided to honor his gift by giving back.

“Since I couldn’t be there for his family, I put my golfing skills to work and joined the Indiana Donor Network Fore Life Open golf committee as chairperson in his honor. I wanted to raise money for the scholarship program so that children (like perhaps my donor’s children) could have the support they need to further their education after losing a parent. It gives me comfort knowing I can honor him and support his family in this way.”

Today, Scot continues to live his new life to the fullest. He did play in the Erik Compton golf outing, enjoys photography and recently traveled to Italy with his family.

Lake Como, Italy.  27 months after transplant. July ‘17

 

11 months after transplant with Erik Compton and my team at his fundraiser for organ donation awareness. March ‘16

 

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